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Dog food 01.06.2021

Baking dog biscuits - recipe and ideas for homemade treats

Thomas by Thomas, Thomas has contributed the technical know-wau uh know-how to dogbible and is not only enthusiastic about Japan, but also calls the Shiba his favorite dog, which hopefully will soon be allowed to take up residence in his Rooftopgarden.

Baking dog treats and biscuits by DYI - healthy and varied treats

No sooner do you stash the groceries on the kitchen shelves than you see the pleading begging in your dog's eyes. It's a good thing you thought of your dog at the supermarket and got some treats.

Are treats unhealthy?

As soon as you hear the pleasurable chewing and smacking of your pet, you may start to wonder if it's healthy to give your dog treats. After all, so many dogs suffer from obesity and a poor diet can shorten your pet's life.

Homemade treats shutterstock.com / Cryptographer

Rewarding and still paying attention to health - how does that work?

You can give your dog dog snacks without a guilty conscience if you follow two important rules:

  1. Make your own dog treats: Look at making dog biscuits pragmatically: homemade dog biscuits are cheaper than store-bought dog biscuits, and they don't contain flavor enhancers or preservatives.
  2. Too much of a good thing is unhealthy: feed your four-legged friend the biscuits only in well-measured quantities. Even if your homemade biscuits are made from healthy ingredients, they should not replace conventional food.

Bake your own dog biscuits - let your creativity run wild

As we all know, the eye eats with us, or at least that's what the old saying goes. What applies to us humans also applies to Bello & Co. You can cut out different shapes, use different ingredients and add fresh fruit and vegetables.

Baking dog biscuits - some ingredients are taboo:

  • chemical additives
  • hot spices
  • white sugar
  • onions
  • cocoa
  • chocolate

Vegetables you should avoid:

The basic dog biscuits recipe consists of:

  1. 100 g whole wheat flour

  2. 100 g oat flakes

  3. 2 tablespoons sunflower oil

Mix all ingredients to a dough and add a little water or flour if necessary until the dough is really smooth. Then you can add different vegetables.

Unsuitable or even poisonous are

  • Eggplants
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Hot peppers

Can dog biscuits be baked in advance?

Since you are not using any preservatives, your homemade dog biscuits will not keep indefinitely. However, you can freeze the biscuits after they dry and thaw small portions at a time.

Get inspired by the following recipes:

Fine Fish Heart Biscuits

Ingredients:

100 g cooked, boneless fish

2 tablespoons freshly chopped herbs

2 tablespoons sunflower oil

1 egg

200 g spelt flour

100 g fine oat flakes

Preparation:

Finely puree the fish and herbs with a blender and place in a bowl. Stir in the sunflower oil and the egg. Add the flour and oat flakes and mix all the ingredients into a dough. Cover the dough and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Roll out the dough to about ten millimetres thick and cut out small hearts with a biscuit cutter. Place on the baking tray and bake in a preheated oven at 180 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes. When cool, place in a cookie tin.

You'll get around 40 pieces and can store the dog biscuits in the fridge for two to three weeks.

Banana biscuits

Ingredients:

  • 2 carrots
  • 1 banana
  • 200 g spelt flour
  • 100 g oat flakes
  • 50 ml sunflower oil
  • possibly water

Preparation:

Mash the banana and grate the carrots finely. Mix with flour, oat flakes and sunflower oil to a dough. Add a little water if necessary.

Roll out the dough to about one centimetre thick and cut into four centimetre squares. Line the baking tray with baking paper and place the squares on it. Bake in a preheated oven at 170 degrees Celsius for 25 minutes.

Leave to dry in the switched off oven for 12 hours. Store the finished biscuits in a linen bag.

You will get about 30 pieces, which you can store for three weeks.

Banner: shutterstock.com / Karen Hermann
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